Monday, September 21, 2009

Barely Jews in the News: Julian Edelman


Our big thanks to the blog Kaplan's Korner, who contacted the New England Patriots about their rookie receiver, Julian Edelman:

Not, according to the Patriots’ media office, which reported that Julian, a first-year wide receiver out of Kent State “has Jewish ancestry but was raised as a Christian.”[1]


Edelman had a good game for the Patriots against the Jets in the place of injured Wes Welker, catching eight balls for 98 yards. But, since he's is "Barely a Jew", we'll emphasize the fact that the Patriots lost, 16:9.

January 4, 2010: Edelman is now profiled.

14 comments:

  1. are you kidding me? what a racist thing to write "Because he is barely a jew we'll emphasize that the pats lost." you wonder why anti-semitism exists . . .it is the sense of superiority coupled with the ridiculous exclusivity showcased by the "chosen" people. And Goy is an insult as well . .

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  2. last time i checked jewish is as much a race as viking or pirate

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  3. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Who_is_a_Jew?

    The definition of who is a Jew varies according to whether it is being considered by Jews based on normative religious statutes, self-identification or by non-Jews for other reasons. Because Jewish identity can include characteristics of an ethnicity, a religion, and citizenship, the definition of who is a Jew has varied, depending on whether a religious, sociological, or ethnic aspect was being considered, particularly since the early 19th century schism.

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  4. FYI:

    1. "Goy" is short for "Goyim", which simply means "The Nations". Doesn't necesarily mean anything derogatory.

    2. "Chosen" doesn't infer superiority. This is a misconception. One can be 'chosen' by God to be 'tested' or 'tried' etc. which is often how it's been traditionally understood.

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  5. Thank you. We NEVER use "goyim" is derogatory; sadly, some people have misconceptions and interpret it as so.

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  6. If goyim is taken as dorogotory because no one knows the definition, it's not enough of an excuse. More like me'erat eiyin and not being able to eat something that simply looks like meat with cheese...

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  7. Not that I think it's really that dorogotory but it is often taken that way.

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  8. I think goy/goyim is OFTEN used in a derogatory way. I often hear something derided as "goyish". To say that it doesn't have a derogatory connotation, to me, is to have your head in the sand. It may technically be short for "The Nations", but you have to be realistic about how its used colloquially.

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  9. Yes, and some people think we shouldn't say "Jew" (as opposed to "Jewish") because that can be considered derogatory as well. To us, that notion is laughable, yet it exists. It's all in the eye of the beholder.

    Ours is a humor website. Do we make fun of goyim/gentiles/non-Jews? Of course. Do we make fun of Jews? Much more often than we do of goyim. You can choose to be offended by it... or not.

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  10. The term "Goy" or "Goyim" etc appears something like 550 times in the Hebrew Bible.. I believe the first mention is when God promises Abraham that his descendants will form a 'goy gadol' ("great nation").

    So assuming that anyone still reads the Bible in Hebrew, the term is indeed understood as 'nation'..

    That said, pretty much any term for anyone could be derogatory.. (Example: "Look at the red face on that Norwegian!")

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  11. Lighten up! Let's not read into it too much, or ridiculously cite this bit of humor as justification for the persecution of an entire race/religion of people over the millennia.
    Lighten up!!!!

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